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Overview:   

Another full day of work.  Like everything else I didn't "have to do it".... but it is making my Cobra a little more special (to me).     Even though I am sure that I will never need the seat adjusters, I installed them anyway.  To do the job right, I welded a steel frame together that inclines the front of the seat by 9 degrees.  This little incline will make the seating position much more comfortable.  To secure the tracks to the steel frame, I drilled and tapped holes and used 5/16" x 1/1/2"stainless bolts.    I used 5/16" grade 8 bolts to secure the seat the frame.   This design (see below) allows the seat to be easily removed.     I also built a 9 degree frame for the passenger side but without the adjusters.   Finally, both seat frames were sprayed with two coats of primer and two topcoats of blue to match the epoxy frame (et al). 

I repositioned the seat adjuster handle in such a way that it will not get buried in the carpet after installation... and be a PITA to use.   To to do this, I drilled out the rivets, removed some of the bend in the handle and reinstalled with nuts/bolts.... and of course a little red loctite.     

     

Driver Side:  Finished including priming and paint.   It attaches to the frame in four places. 

Driver Side:  It is positioned correctly but actually not bolted in place yet.  Note the hole in the middle of the box.  When I improved the frame I added a steel cross-bar specifically so that I could safely mount the 5th point of the safety harness.     

It is easier to see in the upper picture but the bolts (grade 8) pointing upward are fixed in place (like studs) and allow the seat to be easily removed.

Also... I choose to use 5/16 stainless bolts to secure the tracks to the frame.     

Passenger Side:  Finished including priming and paint.   It attaches to the frame in four places with stainless bolts and is inclined at 9 degrees (like the driver side.  It is also constructed to ensure the seats are at the same height.   

Passenger Side:  It is positioned correctly but actually not bolted in place yet.  Note the hole in the middle of the box.  When I improved the frame I added a steel cross-bar specifically so that I could safely mount the 5th point of the safety harness.     

Tapping holes:  Use some kind of threading lubricant....take your time and you will be happy with the result.   The real trick to a nicely threaded hole is start with the  proper size of pilot hole.   Most taps will have the correct pilot drill diameter  embossed on their shaft.   

[Product Image]Driver Side:    Installed over Damplifier - note wire for seat heaters now passes nicely under seat tracks.    

[Product Image]Passenger Side:    Installed over Damplifier:  Does not move but it is inclined and about as solid as you will ever get.  

Installed:   Seats are bolted in and fit exactly as they should.   Same height and seating inclination.       

Tips: 

1. Seat movement:  The natural tendency is to align your seat tracks and seat with the outside frame rail.  However since the transmission  tunnel is not parallel to the outside rail, the seat may contact the tunnel during movement.   A solution to this is to mount the tracks roughly parallel to the tunnel but mount the seat parallel to the outside frame rail.   The seat will always look right but while being moved it will move parallel to tunnel.  

 
I can be reached directly at the Legacy Garage at:  klegacy@comcast.net (SR71 on FFCobra.com)
Last modified: Sept 1, 2009